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We’ve all made the mistake of going shopping when we’re hungry, so we all know what happens: our trolleys get filled with unhealthy treats that we don’t really need, but that we want now, while we forget to stock up on the essentials that we’re going to need for the rest of the week. Even when we know it will make us feel guilty, we do this because of a little thing called ‘projection bias’, which happens when our desire for short-term gratification overrides our longer-term needs. It’s a major barrier to making strategic long-term plans, because it can make it difficult to identify what we’re going to need in the future.

Overcoming projection bias

In this example, it’s easy enough to overcome projection bias - we try in future not to shop when we’re hungry. But there’s a bit more to it than that. We need to be able to form a vision of the future - of our future needs - in a way not influenced by what we’re feeling at the moment.
This applies to more important decisions than what we need to buy at the supermarket. For example, it could mean the difference between a successful business plan and an unsuccessful one, or it could mean that your team reshuffle doesn’t work in the long-run. Any kind of decision or project that will have long-term ramifications needs a strategic approach to make it work - and there’s no room for projection bias when it comes to strategic thinking and planning.

Developing the vision to see your goals fulfilled

We’ve devised a tool that is designed to help you build strategic, realistic long-term goals without succumbing to the influence of biases, available in the iLEAD Tools: Thought Leadership book. It centres around the six core elements needed for goal-planning to be successful, and they go by the acronym “V-SPORT”, which stands for:

● Vision - the focus of your strategy - your end goal

● Stakeholders - who needs to be involved? It could be key customers, investors, or anyone else whose support is critical, and whom you’ll need to keep informed throughout.

● Priorities - having a clear idea of which actions are most important will allow you to make the right decisions if or when time and resources become stretched.

● Opportunities - what do you, and others, stand to gain from the completion of your goal? Will you be able to delegate anything, and if so, what benefits will this bring to those to whom you delegate?

● Risks - what could stop your project from being successful? How can you avoid or manage these risks?

● Timelines - what time and resources are needed to achieve your goal? Flexibility is key when it comes to timings, as you’ll need to be able to accommodate potential future changes, such as new developments in your competitors’ activity.

Within each of these areas, the ‘How to develop strategic long term goals’ tool helps you work through the questions you need to consider in order to achieve your goals. It includes a Strategic Goal Setting Checklist tool, which will help you to make sure that you cover everything and is broken down into sections corresponding with each part of the ‘V-SPORT’ acronym, starting with writing down your vision and taking you right through to fitting your goal in with wider objectives and forecasting future change.

Where do your strengths lie?

Similarly organised is the V-SPORT Self-Analysis Checklist. This allows you to flag up any areas where you may require additional support, and you complete it using a “red, amber, green” answer system to indicate which aspects of V-SPORT you can complete easily and which are likely to be harder to achieve. A simple two-step process will enable you to calculate your results, which will tell you where your strengths lie as well as areas where development may be needed. After this, your answers to a series of questions provided in the tool will help you formulate a plan to achieve your goal.

So what’s stopping you?

If you’ve followed all the steps in the iLEAD Tool so far and you’re still having problems, it could be because you’ve come up against a common barrier to success. To help you get past it, we’ve also included in this tool a reference guide to the most common barriers to success and what you need to do to overcome them. A particularly common one, for instance, is that the goal you’ve set yourself is too big and complicated, and it seems impossible to understand how to go about achieving it. With practical guidance from the iLEAD Tool, you’ll be able to work past this problem. For example, you’ll understand the need to make each milestone as specific as possible.

What happens next?

Having worked your way through the resources provided in the ‘How to develop strategic long term goals’ tool, you’ll be in a much stronger position to set goals in a strategic, considered way, maximising your chances of successfully fulfilling your objectives. The tool also includes a section on the next steps to help you put your plan into action, including advice on gathering feedback that could provide you with valuable insights on your strengths and areas for development.

For more information on how to put this knowledge to effective use, read the ‘How to take responsibility’ tool in the iLEAD™ Task Leadership book.

Shortlisted for the Chartered Management Institute Management Book of the Year Award 2016, iLEAD™ Tools provide you with the advice and practical resources to enable you to develop your task, people and thought leadership skills. By gaining a better understanding of leadership and learning how to lead, from how to communicate your vision to how to make ethical decisions, you will become a better and more effective leader and create stronger and more successful teams.

To read more of Mike Idziaszczyk's blogs, click here.

If you witnessed an accident, what would you do? Would you rush over to help, administering first aid to casualties and calling the emergency services? Or would you stand by and watch, waiting for someone else get involved? However much you’d like to think that you’d be the hero, research suggests that you’re more likely to do the latter. Why?

Leave it to someone else…

This behaviour is called the ‘bystander effect’ or bystander apathy. It arises when we’re afraid of ‘losing face’ in front of strangers. In this situation, it’s because we assume that there are other people better qualified to get involved than we are or that if we step in it may be unhelpful or unwanted. In other words, it’s a fear of failure. It sounds like an irrational fear, particularly when the consequences of our not getting involved could be that someone in trouble doesn’t get the help they need. But it’s been observed in numerous psychological experiments and in real-life emergency situations.

The benefits of being a responsible person

Being more responsible doesn’t just mean that you’re a better person to have around in the event of an accident. When you’re willing to take responsibility, you become a more productive and efficient person. In the workplace, your efforts to become more responsible are sure to get noticed and will help you climb the career ladder, because you won’t just be doing the minimum required to pull your weight – you’ll be owning tasks and showing that you’re someone who’s got what it takes to lead others. Outside work, other people will start to realise that you’re someone they can rely on, bringing new opportunities to enrich your life.

But how do you go about becoming more responsible? You can start by understanding what’s currently holding you back.

What stops us taking responsibility?

We’ve already seen some of the reasons for not taking responsibility in the accident scenario described above. Fear of failure is one of the biggest things that holds us back, as we’re conditioned from an early age to seek approval from other people. This means that unless we’re sure that we’ll be successful, we avoid doing things that could risk drawing criticism. Again tying in with the accident scenario, we’re also held back by an assumption that we don’t have the relevant expertise, and that someone else does.

Other reasons for not stepping up to the mark include lack of time – we perceive ourselves to be too busy to take responsibility for something, though closer inspection may prove that spending too much time being unproductive may in fact be to blame. You may also be avoiding taking responsibility for something because you’re simply not interested in it; examining your own motivations – or those of an employee – may be key to dealing with this mental block. Alternatively, you might actually be willing to take responsibility, but you’re just not sure how to convince other people that you are.

You can become a more responsible person

Our iLead Task Responsibility tool is designed to help you identify, evaluate and challenge your lack of responsibility and the reasons behind it. Employers or managers can also use the tool to help with the personal development of their staff. For each of the reasons for lack of responsibility mentioned above, the tool takes you through a practical step by step process that allows you to work through the underlying causes and become a more responsible person.

Overcoming your fear of failure

To give you an example of how the iLead Task Responsibility Tool can help you become a more responsible person, or help you with training your staff, let’s take a look at the step-by-step process that helps you work through challenging the fear of failure.

Step 1 – identify what it is that you’re afraid of. By defining it, you’re making a start on challenging it.

Step 2 – evaluate the fears you’ve written down, and assess whether they’re rational concerns. What’s the worst that could happen if your fear were to be realised? At this point you can also exercise some methods for keeping your fears in check: writing them down, focusing on the present moment and thinking about the successful moments in your life that you needlessly worried about beforehand.

Step 3 – reinterpret your fears. Peel back the layers of the fear to find out what’s at the bottom of it, and where they originate. For example, are you only afraid because of something that happened to someone else?

Step 4 – do something about it. Talk to other people, who may help to put your fears into perspective, and focus on the positive outcomes from each of your decisions, no matter how small. Gain confidence from thinking about what you’ll learn, and from developing different ways of achieving what you want to achieve – these are your back-up plans, and they make failure less likely.

For more information on how to put this knowledge to effective use, read the ‘How to take responsibility’ tool in the iLEAD™ Task Leadership book.

Shortlisted for the Chartered Management Institute Management Book of the Year Award 2016, iLEAD™ Tools provide you with the advice and practical resources to enable you to develop your task, people and thought leadership skills. By gaining a better understanding of leadership and learning how to lead, from how to communicate your vision to how to make ethical decisions, you will become a better and more effective leader and create stronger and more successful teams.

To read more of Mike Idziaszczyk's blogs, click here.

Back in the 1970s, psychologists worked out that they could motivate rats to pull bells and escape from mazes by positively rewarding the correct behaviour with food. Since then, we’ve come a long way in understanding motivation and how to harness it. Unfortunately, though, human beings are a bit more complicated than rats, and it usually takes more than food to motivate someone to work efficiently.

Recent research shows that the things people are most motivated by are accomplishing something worthwhile, learning new things, personal development and autonomy. But hang on a minute - isn’t that basically what motivates everyone?

We’re all different

Generic ‘motivators’ - such as rewarding behaviour - take a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to motivation and assume that all your employees are the same. In fact, we’re all driven by different things, so positive rewards come in many different guises. Understanding your employees and how each person is different from their colleagues can help you motivate them and boost productivity among your team. Some people, for example, thrive on coming up with new ideas, while others love dealing with people; some people show little enthusiasm for anything but home time.

It's impossible to generalise, so if you really want to motivate your team, you’ll have to adapt your approach to accommodate individual motivations. That means working out broadly what needs they’re driven by, and there are a few basic categories that should immediately help you motivate employees more effectively than trying to take the same approach with everyone.

Figuring out what makes someone tick

To find out what someone is motivated by, look out for certain behaviours and characteristics that define their behaviour in the workplace. Is it the need to achieve? To please? To belong? To be autonomous? Perhaps they need variety, or prefer a clear structure within which to work. Others may be motivated by caring for people; still others by being in control. Talk to employees individually and find out what’s most important to them, what turns them off and what gives them the biggest sense of satisfaction.

You can use this knowledge to your advantage because you’re now in a much stronger position to motivate them. If, for example, competitive behaviour and impatience at themselves and others reveals a need to achieve, you can set them ambitious targets and timeframes, and give them more autonomy for achieving these results. If someone is motivated by a need to belong, you can use them to bring their team together, putting them in a coordination role and making sure they’re working with others rather than on their own.

Need some help?

Luckily, help is at hand in identifying these characteristics, both in yourself and in others. Our iLEAD Motivation Web tool takes the form of a questionnaire that you complete for each of your employees to create a map of their primary motivators. It shouldn’t take you more than five minutes to complete per person, and all you need to do is tick any statement that applies to them.

Motivation Web: The Questionnaire

Section 1: Need to Achieve

  1. Works with a strong sense of urgency

  2. Is often impatient

  3. Enjoys competing with others

  4. Sets self demanding targets

  5. Shows strong disappointment at failure

Section 2: Need to Please

  1. Smoothes over conflicts in the team

  2. Cooperative – is often looking to help others

  3. Responds quickly to a pat on the back

  4. Takes others’ comments very much to heart

  5. Eager to please/impress others

Section 3: Need to Belong

  1. Sociable and talkative

  2. Cohesive in teams – pulling people together

  3. Adaptable in teams

  4. Avoids conflict with colleagues

  5. Easily distracted by others

Section 4: Need for Autonomy

  1. Often chooses to work independently

  2. Manages self – non-reliant on the support of colleagues

  3. Makes up own mind – not easily influenced by others

  4. Can be distracted

  5. Prefers to take control of situations where possible

Section 5: Need for Variety

  1. Excited by new ideas

  2. Starts new projects but doesn’t finish them

  3. Easily bored

  4. Follows own agenda – expedient

  5. Innovative approach

Section 6: Need for Structure

  1. Organised

  2. Reliable

  3. Dislikes ambiguity

  4. Plans work well

  5. Communicates frequently, clearly and consistently

Section 7: Need to Care

  1. Considerate to others’ situation

  2. Genuine concern for colleagues’ welfare

  3. Empathetic

  4. Supportive

  5. Tolerant of others

Section 8: Need for Control

  1. Takes control of team activities

  2. Sees others’ support as interference

  3. Does things in own way, regardless of feedback

  4. Becomes tense in uncertain situations

  5. Finds it difficult to delegate to others

Once the questionnaire is complete, you add up the number of ticks for each section and then use these scores to mark up the accompanying ‘Motivation Web’ on the relevant part of the 1-5 scale. You can then join the scores up to reveal high and low motivators, and put this knowledge to use in motivating your team. For example, if someone is revealed to be highly motivated by the need to please, you can take the time to recognise their achievements and reward good work. If the need to please comes up as a low motivator, you could have a gentle word with them about being careful not to upset colleagues, as well as giving them a more autonomous role that encourages them to work more independently.

For more information on how to put this knowledge to effective use, our iLEAD business psychology books and tools give you the resources you need to work out what motivates your team. Download yours today and get your employees working more productively than ever before!

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